Journal article
Anthropocene Risk

Keys, P., V. Galaz, M. Dyer, N. Matthews, C. Folke, M. Nyström, and S. Cornell. 2019. Anthropocene Risk. Nature Sustainability 2:667–673.

The potential consequences of cross-scale systemic environmental risks with global effects are increasing. We argue that current descriptions of globally connected systemic risk poorly capture the role of human–environment interactions. This creates a bias towards solutions that ignore the new realities of the Anthropocene. We develop an integrated concept of what we denote Anthropocene risk—that is, risks that: emerge from human-driven processes; interact with global...

Beijer Discussion Paper
Our Future in the Anthropocene Biosphere: Global sustainability and resilient societies

Folke et al. 2020. Beijer Discussion Paper 272: Our Future in the Anthropocene Biosphere: Global sustainability and resilient societies. Beijer Discussion Paper Series.

The corona pandemic has exposed the interconnected, tightly coupled and vulnerable globalised world. This White Paper sets the scientific stage for understanding and responding to such crises for global sustainability and resilient societies. We provide a systemic overview of the current situation; where people and nature are dynamically intertwined and embedded in the biosphere, placing shocks and extreme events as part of this dynamic; where...

Journal article
EAT-Lancet vs. #yes2meat: Understanding the digital backlash to the ‘planetary health diet’

Garcia, D., V. Galaz and S. Daume. 2019. EAT-Lancet vs. #yes2meat: Understanding the digital backlash to the ‘planetary health diet’. The Lancet DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)32526-7.

Book
Global Challenges, Governance, and Complexity Applications and Frontiers

Galaz. V. (ed.). 2019. Global Challenges, Governance, and Complexity Applications and Frontiers. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK.

There is an increased interest in integrating insights from the complexity sciences to studies of governance and policy. While the issue has been debated, and the term of ‘complexity’ has multiple and sometimes contested interpretations, it is also clear the field has spurred a number of interesting theoretical and empirical efforts. The book includes key thinkers in the field, elaborates on different analytical approaches in...

Journal article
Anatomy and resilience of the global production ecosystem

Nyström, M., J.-B. Jouffray, A. V. Norström, B. Crona, P. Søgaard-Jørgensen, S. R. Carpenter, Ö. Bodin, V. Galaz, and C. Folke. 2019. Anatomy and resilience of the global production ecosystem. Nature 575:98-108.

Much of the Earth’s biosphere has been appropriated for the production of harvestable biomass in the form of food, fuel and fibre. Here we show that the simplification and intensification of these systems and their growing connection to international markets has yielded a global production ecosystem that is homogenous, highly connected and characterized by weakened internal feedbacks. We argue that these features converge to yield...

Journal article
Transnational Corporations and the Challenge of Biosphere Stewardship

Folke, C., H. Österblom, J.-B. Jouffray, E. Lambin, M. Scheffer, B.I. Crona, M. Nyström, S.A. Levin, S.R. Carpenter, J.M. Anderies, S. Chapin III, A.-S. Crépin, A. Dauriach, V. Galaz, L.J. Gordon, N. Kautsky, B.H. Walker, J.R. Watson, J. Wilen & A. de Zeeuw. 2019. Transnational Corporations and the Challenge of Biosphere Stewardship. Nature, Ecology and Evolution 3:1396–1403.

Sustainability within planetary boundaries requires concerted action by individuals, governments, civil society and private actors. For the private sector, there is concern that the power exercised by transnational corporations generates, and is even central to, global environmental change. Here, we ask under which conditions transnational corporations could either hinder or promote a global shift towards sustainability. We show that a handful of transnational corporations have...

Book chapter
Time and Politics in the Anthropocene: Too Fast, Too Slow?

Galaz, V. 2019. Time and Politics in the Anthropocene: Too Fast, Too Slow?. In: Biermann F. and E. Lövbrand. Anthropocene Encounters: New Directions in Green Political Thinking. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Pp. 109−127.

Journal article
Social-Ecological Systems Insights for Navigating the Dynamics of the Anthropocene

Reyers, B., C. Folke, M-L. Moore, R. Biggs, and V. Galaz. 2018. Social-Ecological Systems Insights for Navigating the Dynamics of the Anthropocene. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 43:267-289.

Social-ecological systems (SES) research offers new theory and evidence to transform sustainable development to better contend with the challenges of the Anthropocene. Four insights from contemporary SES literature on (a) intertwined SES, (b) cross-scale dynamics, (c) systemic tipping points, and (d) transformational change are explored. Based on these insights, shifts in sustainable development practice are suggested to recognize and govern the complex and codeveloping social...

Journal article
Societal causes of, and responses to, ocean acidification

Jagers, S.C., S. Matti, A-S. Crépin, D. Langlet, J.N. Havenhand, M. Troell, H.L. Filipsson, V.R. Galaz, and L.G. Anderson. 2019. Societal causes of, and responses to, ocean acidification. Ambio 48(8):816–830.

Major climate and ecological changes affect the world’s oceans leading to a number of responses including increasing water temperatures, changing weather patterns, shrinking ice-sheets, temperature-driven shifts in marine species ranges, biodiversity loss and bleaching of coral reefs. In addition, ocean pH is falling, a process known as ocean acidification (OA). The root cause of OA lies in human policies and behaviours driving society’s dependence on...

Beijer Discussion Paper
Addressing Pathological Dynamics of Global Environmental Problems

Peterson, G., R. Biggs, A.-S. Crépin, and V. Galaz. 2017. Beijer Discussion Paper 260: Addressing Pathological Dynamics of Global Environmental Problems. Beijer Discussion Paper Series.

Human wellbeing has improved greatly over the past century, but the very processes that have facilitated this rise have created many seemingly intractable global environmental problems that threaten future human well-being. We suggest that the intractability of these problems may arise from various underlying “pathological dynamics” where certain features of social-ecological systems interact with governance and management efforts in a way that consistently leads to...