Building back better after Covid-19

There are many calls to use the Covid-19 crisis as an opportunity for transforming to a future trajectory that is more equitable and environmentally sustainable. But this window of opportunity may be short, researchers warn, and propose that resilience theory could provide the necessary framework to achieve real transformational change. Resilience is the capacity of a system, be it a forest, a city or an...

Flawed assumptions risk undermining ocean’s potential for SDGs

Increasing the production of food from the ocean is seen as one important pathway toward more sustainable and healthier human diets. Yet this potential is threatened by competing uses of ocean resources in an accelerating ‘‘blue economy’ and by a too narrow focus on production growth, researchers warn in a perspective in the journal One Earth. Policy and research must apply a broader food systems...

Review: “Nature is a blind spot in economics that we ignore at our peril”

A fundamental change in how we think about and approach economics is needed if we are to reverse biodiversity loss and protect and enhance our prosperity, says a new  independent landmark review on the Economics of Biodiversity. First economic framework for biodiversity Beijer Fellow Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta’s review, commissioned by the UK Treasury, presents the first comprehensive economic framework of its kind for biodiversity....

Blind spots in visions of a ‘‘blue economy’’ could undermine the ocean’s contribution to eliminating hunger and malnutrition

Increasing the production of food from the ocean is seen as a pathway toward more sustainable and healthier human diets. Yet this potential is being overshadowed by competing uses of ocean resources in an accelerating ‘‘blue economy.’’ The current emphasis on production growth, rather than equitable distribution of benefits, has created three unexamined or flawed assumptions that growth in the blue economy will lead to...

Navigating the chaos of an unfolding global cycle

There are many calls to use the COVID 19 crisis as an opportunity for transforming to a future trajectory that is more equitable and environmentally sustainable. What is lacking is a cohesive framework for bringing these calls together. We propose that such transitions could be informed by lessons from three decades of scholarship on abrupt and surprising change in systems of humans and nature. Over...

Easing the burden of climate migration

The number of people leaving their homes to flee climate related catastrophes such as storms, wildfires or drought, will rise as the effects of global warming become more apparent. Such climate migration comes with great personal costs for those forced to move, but there is also a societal price for the origin and destination locations. However, because it is a potentially effective adaptation to climate...

Machine intelligence, systemic risks, and sustainability

Automated decision making and predictive analytics in combination with rapid progress in sensor technology and robotics are likely to change the way individuals, communities, governments and private actors perceive and respond to climate and ecological change. Machine intelligent methods are already today being applied within a number of research fields related to climate change and environmental monitoring. Investments into applications of these technologies in agriculture,...

Seafood companies act on science based goals to save the oceans

For the first time in the history of seafood production, ten of the largest seafood companies in the world have committed to a set of time-bound and measurable goals that will ensure the industry becomes more sustainable. The goals are the result of four years of dialogues through the science-industry initiative Seafood Business for Ocean Stewardship (SeaBOS).    SeaBOS is a unique collaboration between scientists...